CDC Novel Coronavirus

Investigating the Impact of COVID-19 during Pregnancy

Epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 in Pregnancy and Infancy (ESPI) Network

ESPI – Electronic Cohort Study

This study will collect information from the medical records of women at three participating sites who received prenatal care and reached the end of their pregnancy during March 2020 through February 2021. Data collection will include information about the following:

  • demographic and maternal characteristics;
  • medical conditions;
  • prenatal care;
  • pregnancy complications, including ambulatory care visits and hospitalizations for acute illness;
  • postpartum care;
  • laboratory test results for SARS-CoV-2 and influenza;
  • pregnancy outcomes; and
  • selected infant outcomes through 6 months of age.

This study aims to understand the characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, up to six months after the end of pregnancy, and among infants up to six months of age. It also aims to identify risk factors for severe COVID-19 disease, describe use of investigational and off-label therapeutics, and evaluate effects of medically attended SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy and infant outcomes.

ESPI – Community Cohort Study

This multisite collaboration is designed to estimate the incidence of asymptomatic and symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and understand the characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women. This includes the spectrum of illness and risk factors for infection and severe illness. As a secondary objective, this study will examine the effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy on pregnancy and newborn outcomes. The study will enroll pregnant women at <28 weeks of pregnancy. The women will be followed with weekly surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 infection and symptoms of COVID-19-like illness through the end of their pregnancies. Information on end-of-pregnancy, infant, and postpartum outcomes will be collected from participants at approximately 2-4 weeks after the end of their pregnancies.

Read the original article at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Related Articles

Close